Link Aggregation in Linux Mint 18.1 and Xubuntu 16.04

📅 January 7, 2017
coverDo you have a few spare network interface cards?

Want to increase your local network throughput and handle more traffic?

Link aggregation, or bonding, is a technique that combines two or more network interface cards (NICs) into a single virtual network interface for greater throughput.

For example, two gigabit NICs result in 2 Gbps throughput. Three gigabit NICs allow 3 Gbps throughput. Four allow 4 Gbps, and so on. While these are theoretical maximum values and other factors affect network transfer rates, the point is that multiple network cards acting as a single “card” can transfer more data at a time. As an example, more users can access the same server simultaneously without seeing any noticeable drop in transfer speeds.

Linux supports link aggregation out of the box with only a few modifications. Regular, inexpensive network cards and switches can be used, so there is no need to purchase expensive, specialized hardware. This allows you to reuse existing hardware that you might already have on hand. And yes, it works well.

While link aggregation has worked in the past, newer Linux distributions tend to change a few things, so older setup techniques need revision. This is the case with Linux Mint 18.1. For details regarding the benefits of link aggregation, please have a look at the article describing link aggregation in Linux Mint 17 and Xubuntu 14.04 (July 12, 2014). The information is still relevant.

Link aggregation works well in Linux Mint 18.1, but a few changes are needed in order to make it work. However, it is easier than expected!

Read the rest of this entry »

, ,

Leave a comment

Are You Smarter Than Chess for Linux?

📅 December 29, 2016
chess07The classic, time-tested game of pure skill called chess is available for Linux, and it is called…Chess.

Chess games are plentiful on many different platforms, and this is one version that is available for Linux. It features a GUI, simple pieces, and simple play mechanics.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , ,

Leave a comment

Software – A Better Software Manager for Linux Mint

📅 December 23, 2016
coverLinux Mint is a superb operating system, but its default software manager is rather lacking. We can install a better software manager that looks sleeker and is easier to navigate than Linux Mint’s Software Manager.

This article shows how to install the gnome-software program, which is the same user-friendly software manager seen in Ubuntu and Xubuntu. Yes, we can use it in Linux Mint.

Read the rest of this entry »

,

Leave a comment

i7z – What Is Your i7/i5/i3 CPU Doing?

📅 December 20, 2016
coverAre you pondering important life questions, such as, “What is the temperature and current frequency of my Core i7 CPU?”

“I have no idea what C0/C1/C3/C6/C7 states are, but I sure want to know how much time my CPU spends in them.”

“What is the stepping, model, and family info of my i7 CPU? Are we related in some way?”

Well, ponder no longer because the command line program i7z (a reporting tool for Intel i7/i5/i3 processors) will answer those questions for you in real time. And if that is not enough, information can be logged to a log file for serious analysis later.

Read the rest of this entry »

, ,

Leave a comment

bindechexascii – The Command-Line Converter

📅 December 16, 2016
cover

Wha…what?

Need a quick and easy way to convert between binary, ASCII, decimal, and hexadecimal values?

Try bindechexascii!

 

Read the rest of this entry »

,

Leave a comment

Hide Text in Text Files Using stegsnow

📅 December 14, 2016
coverSteganography is the practice (or art) of hiding secret messages in plain view.

Take an image file of a flower, for example. Opening the file shows a flower. Whoopie. However, there might be a hidden message encoded inside the bits and bytes of the image data that is not visible unless certain software is used to decode it.

The same can apply to text files. You could write an innocent readme.txt file that looks like any other text file of instructions when opened normally. With steganography, you could encode a secret message within readme.txt that includes game cheat codes, secret contact information, a cookie recipe, ASCII art, or whatever else you wish to convey to your accomplice who receives the file.

stegsnow is a fun command line program that encodes secret messages in ASCII text files. Use stegsnow to encode a text file with a hidden message, and then use stegsnow again to extract the message from the file. The file’s text contents are not altered, so the file reads the same as it did before encoding. Anyone unaware would open the text file and see the innocent text contents in a standard text editor, but “those who know” would run the file with stegsnow to see a completely different message.

Read the rest of this entry »

, ,

Leave a comment

rig – The Random Identity Generator

📅 December 7, 2016
coverSeeking fun with random identities? Need a fake name and address but cannot seem to think of anything?

Try rig!

rig is a command line program that generates simple names and addresses for use with registration where you might need a fake name in order to avoid spam or for whatever reason…like just plain fun.

Read the rest of this entry »

, ,

Leave a comment