Posts Tagged ubuntu

Linux Mint 18, Ubuntu 16.04, Xubuntu 16.04, and the Samsung 950 Pro 256G M.2

📅 April 21, 2016
xub1604gUbuntu 16.04 was released earlier today (April 21, 2016), and it feels like Christmas!

This also means that the Ubuntu derivatives, such as Xubuntu 16.04, will also be available. In fact, Xubuntu 16.04 is also available for download today. Plus, 16.04 is the Long Term Support version (LTS), making it a replacement for the venerable and reliable 14.04.

With two new operating systems available, how will they handle the Samsung 950 Pro M.2 NVMe 256G SSD? Will Ubuntu/Xubuntu 16.04 install? What will boot times be like?

Update: This article has been updated to include results for Linux Mint 18 Cinnamon.

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A Quick Look At Ubuntu MATE 14.10 In VirtualBox

📅 November 13, 2014

ubmate05Those with fond memories of the simplicity offered by GNOME 2 during the Ubuntu 10.10 glory days should feel somewhat comfortable with the MATE desktop environment. There is much to like about GNOME 2 before Ubuntu switched to Unity and GNOME 3, and MATE attempts to preserve the traditional GNOME 2 experience on today’s Linux distributions.

While MATE can be installed separately in practically any Linux distribution, Ubuntu MATE is an Ubuntu distribution that offers MATE out of the box.

With 14.10 now available, I tried Ubuntu MATE 14.10 in VirtualBox to see how it would perform. How does it install? What does it look like? Here are a few thoughts.

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How to Disable the Crash Report Dialog in Ubuntu 13.10

apportUbuntu 13.10 (and Xubuntu 13.10) will often display a crash report dialog when something goes awry. Sometimes crashes are major and require assistance, but most of the time they tend to be insignificant (check the crash details) and the system continues to function fine despite their occurrence.

However, the crash report dialog still appears, and this can be annoying. Is there any way to suppress the dialogs? Yes, there is!

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Creating a Common Shared Directory for Virtual Machines and Trusted Users on a LAN

sh002A previous article, Local File Sharing in Linux, provided a way for local users on the same Linux computer to share files among themselves where each user viewed himself as the owner of the file. There are other ways to achieve similar results, but given the objectives, this technique worked well.

However, that works well for local users. What about extending the access to networked users on the same LAN? How about providing a common shared directory so Linux and Windows virtual machines can share files among themselves?

VirtualBox is a popular virtualization program that has a built-in folder sharing feature that allows the guest (the OS running inside VirtualBox) operating system to access host (the system on which VirtualBox is running) directories without using a network connection. This option is found in the VirtualBox menubar Devices > Shared Folders, and it allows the guest direct access to host files even if the network cable is disconnected.

This works well with a Windows guest, but a Linux guest is a little trickier to configure. Yes, VirtualBox provides the vbox server for Linux and it does provide direct access to host directories, but there have been issues with Linux. In the end, other networking technologies, such as SSH, FTP, and Samba, are easier to configure and maintain for Linux (guest)-to-Linux (host) file transfers through VirtualBox. This article covers how to handle Linux (guest)-to-Linux (host) file sharing without using the vbox server.

The public shared directory presented in this article must meet certain objectives:

  • One specific shared directory located on the host.
  • Accessible by any user/virtual machine connected to the network.
  • No username/password needed. Simply enter the shared IP address to connect.
  • Any user may create/modify/delete any other user’s files and directories.
  • User access is restricted to the shared directory.

These items are not recommended for use on a public network whose user reputations are questionable, but this level of freedom is fine for a trusted private network where users and virtual machines trust each other and are guaranteed to be the only users.

This article shows how to set up this arrangement implementing Samba on Linux Mint 15, though other Linux distributions should work as well. There are separate steps that must be configured on the host and for the guests.

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Ubuntu 13.10 and Xubuntu 13.10

xu001Ubuntu 13.10 and Xubuntu 13.10 were released a few days ago. Yippee! I was eager to play with them to see what improvements have been made, so I installed them in VirtualBox 4.2.18 and clicked away.

This is a short review of my initial thoughts and impressions of these two Linux distributions.

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Linux Installation Times in VirtualBox

lm10How long does it take various Linux distributions to install, login, and shutdown in VirtualBox?

A few of today’s Linux distributions (along with a few older ones) were installed and timed using a regular stopwatch to mirror real-world usage times, and here are the results.

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Installing Kernel 3.10.6 in Linux Mint 15

Installing a new kernel in Linux Mint 15 is the same easy process as installing a new kernel in Ubuntu. Kernel 3.10.6 installs in Linux Mint 15, and it works well without any problems (so far).

Kernel installation is mostly a safe operation in Linux, and it provides the benefit of having an updated engine running under the Linux hood often months before the new kernel is added to the repository.

Prebuilt kernels are available for Ubuntu and its derivatives, such as Linux Mint 15, so there is no need to spend lengthy time compiling your own kernel unless you wish to have specific features.

This shows how to install kernel 3.10.6-saucy in Linux Mint 15.
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