Posts Tagged hardware

Samsung EVO Plus 256GB MicroSD and Linux

πŸ“… February 12, 2018
“What can we expect from a 256GB microSD card in Linux? Is it truly as fast as the box claims?”

MicroSD cards are increasing in capacity. The latest consumer-friendly capacity available at a somewhat reasonable price (as of the time of this writing) is the 256GB card. Yes, 256GB on an itty-bitty card so small you could lose it in a vacuum cleaner, accidentally dump it in the trash, and wonder where it went…and given its cost, you would probably cry in the meantime.

Today’s microSD card is the Samsung EVO+ 256GB with a UHS speed class of 3 (U3). The box claims up to 100MB/s read and 90MB/s write speeds.” Hmm, we shall see. Box claims always tend to be exaggerated — especially when the fine print on the back indicates that the actual transfer speed might be lower for whatever reason.

Nonetheless, this card does produce decent results, and it is 100% compatible with Linux. Let’s look at a few benchmarks.

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Fix the Immediate Resume Following Suspend

πŸ“… December 5, 2017
Linux Mint 18.3 was released a few days ago!

Despite being a superb Linux distribution, some fundamental problems remain. One such problem is the suspend/resume feature.

After installing Linux Mint 18.3 MATE, I found that if I assign a keyboard shortcut to suspend the system, the Linux system will go into suspend mode but immediately resume.

Power management issues, such as suspend and hibernation, have plagued Linux systems with a variety of distributions across a variety of hardware that I have tried, but since Linux Mint is my preferred distribution, this it the one I am focusing on.

Windows does not have this problem from my usage. Given the same hardware, I have found that Windows will suspend/hibernate/shutdown without any of the problems that are apparent with Linux, such as blank resume screens (requiring a system reset button press), no resuming, dead hibernation (never waking up), or immediate resumption following a suspend.

This article shows a quick way to fix the suspend issue so that we can assign a keyboard shortcut that will suspend Linux. Pressing the power button on the computer will wake up the system.

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The Acer Predator X34 and Linux: Does It Work?

πŸ“… September 9, 2017
“Does the Predator X34 ultra widescreen monitor work with Linux?”

Ultra widescreen 21:9 displays are increasing in numbers. Most reviews focus on games and Windows, but how well does a 21:9 aspect ratio monitor work with Linux?

Specifically, what can we expect with the top-of-the-line Acer Predator X34 display with a 100Hz refresh rate? Will the picture be stretched? Can we achieve a refresh rate higher than 60Hz in Linux? Will G-Sync truly produce smoother gameplay? Are there any unknown issues to be aware of when using Linux?

Yes, there are issues. Here are my results when testing the monitor with Linux Mint 18.2, Xubuntu 16.04, and Windows 7.

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Linux Hardware – How Well Has It Performed? Part 2

πŸ“… July 3, 2017
Here are three more items that have stood the test of time:

Let’s compare how well they have performed over time with Linux.

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Linux Hardware – How Well Has It Performed? Part 1

πŸ“… June 30, 2017
How have past hardware devices held up over time when used with Linux?

Time proves what works and what does not. Having used a variety of hardware with Linux, do these devices still perform today?

Here are a few devices that I have used used along with a few comparison notes between then and now.

 

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The Samsung 960 EVO 250G and Linux. How Well Does It Work?

πŸ“… June 8, 2017
What? Your M.2 NVMe SSD is not fast enough and you want faster speeds?

I have had superb, speedy success using the Samsung 950 Pro NVMe SSD in Linux. Everything from system installation, booting, and everyday usage is a resounding success — even on a Z87-based motherboard.

With the release of the newer Samsung 960 EVO, would Linux performance be as good as or better than the 950 Pro?

Having finally acquired a Samsung 960 EVO 250G SSD for myself, it was time to find out.

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The EVGA GTX 1060 SC and Linux Mint 18.1

πŸ“… May 30, 2017
Running Linux at high resolutions with fancy desktop effects works well on low-end graphics cards, but I wanted smoother performance, silent or near-silent graphics, and plenty of ports for different monitors. What to do?

Why, look for a new card, of course!

The latest 1080 line from Nvidia is overkill for my needs, but the 1060 is perfect. I wanted smoother desktop effects compared to the older Radeon card I had been using, and when I found the EVGA 1060 SC 3GB graphics card on sale, it was a must-buy.

Featuring lower power consumption, more cores, higher clock speeds, five ports to connect a variety of monitors, and favorable performance (in case my original plans on Linux are lackluster I can still use this card elsewhere), this 1060 card is a winner for my humble needs.

There are two versions of the GTX 1060: a 3GB version and a 6GB version. After pondering various benchmarks and reviews, I saw almost no difference between the two versions (other than the huge price difference at the time), so I chose the 3GB version. After all, it was on sale comparable to theΒ cost of a lesser 1050, which only had three ports.

The real questions are these:

  • “How does the EVGA GTX 1060 SC perform in Linux Mint 18.1?”
  • “Is it easy to install drivers?”
  • “Does it even work at all?”

Here is my experience installing and using this card with Linux Mint 18.1 64-bit.

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