Posts Tagged hardware

Programming the Logitech G513 RGB Keyboard Lights in Linux with g810-led

๐Ÿ“… May 21, 2020
The Logitech G513 RGB Mechanical keyboard has earned its place as the best keyboard I have ever used.

The keys have the best tactile approach, the build quality is superb with the metal top, the wrist rest is durable and soft, the size is convenient, the LEDs are confined to the key letters only (no light bleeding), and it just works with Linux.

But did you know that you can program each LED key individually with Bash to Python to create your own effects?

Do you want two random colors to be spread across the keys upon boot? Would you like a Pac-Man effect that pretends a yellow Pac-Man moves around the keys like a maze? Do you have different lighting patterns that you would like to assign to each user on the same Linux system?

All of this and more is possible with a free Linux program called g810-led that you can use with scripts.

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The Mad Catz R.A.T. 8+ 1000 Limited Edition and Linux

๐Ÿ“… January 14, 2020
Look at the colors!

The Mad Catz R.A.T. 8+ is a fine mouse that works well with Linux, so how can it be improved? Why, with a new color scheme, of course!

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Intel NUC, Linux, Pi-Hole, and NAS – Part 1: The Hardware and Xubuntu 19.10

๐Ÿ“… November 2, 2019
Have you heard of an Intel NUC?

A NUC (Next Unit of Computing) is a full-fledged computer system packed in a small — SMALL! — compact case that utilizes minimal power. Almost anything you can do with a desktop system you can also do with a NUC, and the performance is about equivalent to a desktop system depending upon the version of NUC you are using. It is great for a light-weight, miniature computer system, and it supports Linux!

I had the chance to play with a NUC and Xubuntu 19.10 lately, and this is the first of a multi-part series of articles that shows a few adventures I had with it.

The goal is to build a standalone Xubuntu 19.10 computer system running Pi-Hole, acting as a NAS (complete with FTP and SSH servers), and utilizing link aggregation (bonding) using two gigabit Ethernet ports to double the network throughput to 2Gbps instead of 1Gbps to test DLNA media server features.

This first part will focus on the hardware side of things, benchmarking NVMe and SSD performance with CrystalDiskMark in Windows 10, and then installing Xubuntu 19.10.

Ready? Let’s get started!

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The UGREEN USB Card Reader and Linux

๐Ÿ“… October 1, 2019
Here is a nifty device that I have been using with Linux for some time: The UGREEN USB Card Reader.

It is a USB 3.0 microSD and SD card reader the size of a larger USB stick possessing Type-A and Type-C plugs that can read two cards at a time. And best of all, it is 100% compatible with Linux!

 

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More SATA Ports for Linux

๐Ÿ“… July 24, 2019
“Oops! My motherboard ran out of SATA ports. How can I add more?”

This was indeed my predicament after all eight SATA-III ports on my motherboard were used by hard drives, and I needed to connect more hard drives to the same system. (RAID in Linux is super cool!)

Is there a way to increase the SATA port count beyond the motherboard limitations?

Yes, and it involved using an inexpensive SATA controller card. I bought one for myself, and it has been working brilliantly in Linux. Here are my thoughts.

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Samsung 970 EVO Plus and Linux

๐Ÿ“… June 26, 2019
“NVMe again!”

What? You say a 3.5″ 7200 RPM hard drive generating heat from its loud whirring noise is not fast enough? Then, why not upgrade to faster, smaller storage in the form of NVMe in an M.2 slot?

In my attempt to develop a faster system, I tried the 500GB and the 1TB Samsung 970 EVO Plus NVMe M.2 stick in Linux Mint 19.1 to replace a slow, outdated, out-of-warranty 7200 RPM hard drive from 2008.

Here are my results and thoughts about this fantastic stick of silicon the size of a stick of gum used with Linux Mint.

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The Customizable Mad Catz RAT 8+ Optical Mouse and Linux

๐Ÿ“… May 8, 2019
It blinks! I pulsates! It offers high precision! It’s back!

The Mad Catz R.A.T.7 and the M.M.O.7 are without a doubt the best computer mice that I have ever used, and they continue to work to this day.

However, after a few years of constant use, buttons are becoming loose, and plastic is becoming sticky. What better excuse to acquire a new mouse?

Mad Catz is back with an improved RAT line of eight different models. With the Mad Catz RAT 8+ being closest to the original R.A.T.7 that I adore so much, I decided to purchase the 8+ for myself and see how well it performs with today’s Linux Mint 19.1.

Wow! Am I glad I did!

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