How To Set Up RetroPie 3.5 on Raspberry Pi 2 – Part 1

📅 February 13, 2016
titleCraving video game nostalgia? Curious to experiment with homemade creations? Have a Raspberry Pi?

Explore the fun of RetroPie!

RetroPie is software that turns your Raspberry Pi into a multi-console-arcade emulation system that allows you to play games and homemade software. Missing those older systems that are no longer available? With RetroPie, you can play games rendered in high-definition crispness and detail and control them using USB or Bluetooth wireless controllers, such as the Dual Shock 4.

This tutorial shows how to setup RetroPie 3.5 on a Raspberry Pi 2 Model B.

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USB Audio and RetroPie 3.4 for Better Sound on the Raspberry Pi 2

📅 February 9, 2016
usbaudio1The Raspberry Pi 2 is a convenient miniature computer for a multitude of weekend projects, but its audio output quality is lackluster.

White noise, background hiss, low-volume, subdued bass, and missing trebles leave room for improvement — especially when using the Raspberry Pi with audio-enjoyment software, such as RetroPie and Kodi.

Is there a way to upgrade the Pi’s audio quality?

Yes! Using a small USB audio device that plugs into any of the Pi’s USB ports, audio can be rerouted to the USB audio device for improved audio quality.

This tutorial shows how to use the Plugable USB Audio Adapter
with a Raspberry Pi 2 Model B running RetroPie 3.4 to produce a boost in sound quality.

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PNY 128G MicroSD vs. Patriot 128G MicroSD

bothcardsPNY or Patriot? PNY or Patriot?

With 128G MicroSD cards falling to near-identical prices, the choice becomes more about performance than cost.

The PNY 128G High Performance MicroSD card and the Patriot 128G LX Series MicroSD card were exactly the same price, so which one offers better read and write speeds? Do they live up to the promises made on the packaging? Are they compatible with Linux? With they work with the Kingston MicroSD reader?

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php: Get Random Image

📅 February 4, 2016
randimgUsing a similar technique as the random text PHP code, here is a simple code snippet that chooses an image file at random and displays it in a browser.

This is useful for randomizing a banner image on a web page. Each time the browser refreshes, a different banner image (should) appear. While the same effect can be performed using JavaScript, what if JavaScript is disabled in the browser?

By moving the code to the server side, a random banner image (or any kind of image) will appear in order to add freshness to a page.

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php: Get Random Text

📅 February 3, 2016
img-php-randquoteHere is a simple but fun PHP code snippet that displays one of several text strings chosen at random to add an element of surprise to a page.

First of all, a working PHP server is required in order to process PHP scripts. This could be a virtual machine using VirtualBox, for example, or something else on any platform. This short tutorial assumes that you have one set up and working.

 

 

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The SanDisk Ultra II SSD and Linux

📅 January 6, 2016
ultra2aThere is nothing like the joy of having the chance to try a new Solid State Drive (SSD) with Linux! After all, Linux runs so well, that if anything goes wrong, it must be the drive’s fault.

Having acquired a brand new SanDisk Ultra II 120G SSD, I was eager to see how it would perform with Linux Mint 17.3. Since this drive is one of the newer models, I was pleased to see that it exceeded all expectations by meeting the claims on the box and *almost* reaching speeds of the legendary Samsung 840 EVO SSD.

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Linux Mint 17.3 – Another Great Update

📅 December 16, 2015
lm173Linux Mint 17.3 was released a few days ago, and after using this new version for a while on a main system, I can say that this is definitely another worthy upgrade.

At first glance following installation, you might wonder, “What’s the difference? It looks the same as before.”

While 17.3 does appear similar to previous versions, 17.3 sports more polish and refinement in little areas as well as more robust operation (apparently). To start with, there is a new set of wallpapers available, and as you use the system over time, the improvements become noticeable.

For example, tweaks have been made throughout the operating system that simplify usage, and certain Nemo freezes (on the Cinnamon version) that I experienced involving SSH and SFTP did not occur in 17.3. It feels as if more time was spent ensuring a polished system.

The default eyecandy is familiar, but this is a good thing since it is a user interface people are already accustomed to. Users can dive in immediately.

Linux Mint 17.3 is a Trusty-based derivation and installs kernel 3.19.0-32, so any Trusty software you already have will work (assuming 32-bit or 64-bit).

As always, time will disclose the reliability of Linux Mint 17.3, but so far, this is certainly one of the best Linux distributions available and quite possibly superior to Ubuntu. Everything from installation to usage to maintenance is easy and hassle-free in Linux Mint, and 17.3 provides even more frustration-free computing. It is no wonder that Linux Mint dominates the Page Hit Ranking score on distrowatch.com as the most popular Linux distribution. Linux Mint does things right without getting in the way of using the computer and without annoying the user.

Beyond a doubt, this is the easiest and most enjoyable operating system I have ever used out all operating systems available over the past years, and I would recommend it to those seeking Linux.

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