Speed Up Linux Boot by Disabling Services

📅 June 19, 2017
What’s this? You installed Linux to a speedy M.2 NVMe SSD but boot times are not as fast as expected?

It might be a software issue. When Linux boots from power on, it runs a number of services before you ever see the login screen. Some of these services have timeouts and increase delays. Other services might be completely unnecessary, but they are loaded during boot anyway.

By disabling unneeded services, the Linux boot time can be reduced by a few seconds.

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The EVGA GTX 1050 SC and Linux. What can you expect?

📅 June 17, 2017
Given a low-powered A10-7860K system for everyday tasks, is it possible to install a GTX 1050 graphics cards for improved graphics?

Absolutely, but be prepared to encounter issues involving the required proprietary drivers needed to make the 1050 run with Linux.

Having acquired a 1050, here are my delightful results with Linux Mint 18.1.

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How to Set Up Anonymous FTP with ProFTP

📅 June 10, 2017
Anonymous FTP is a handy way to provide public files to users over a LAN. Any user may log in to the FTP server without requiring an account on the FTP server itself. Just log in as anonymous and download.

But how can we set this up?

In this quick tutorial, we will see how the process works and what configuration settings must be made for a read-only anonymous FTP login.

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The Samsung 960 EVO 250G and Linux. How Well Does It Work?

📅 June 8, 2017
What? Your M.2 NVMe SSD is not fast enough and you want faster speeds?

I have had superb, speedy success using the Samsung 950 Pro NVMe SSD in Linux. Everything from system installation, booting, and everyday usage is a resounding success — even on a Z87-based motherboard.

With the release of the newer Samsung 960 EVO, would Linux performance be as good as or better than the 950 Pro?

Having finally acquired a Samsung 960 EVO 250G SSD for myself, it was time to find out.

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The EVGA GTX 1060 SC and Linux Mint 18.1

📅 May 30, 2017
Running Linux at high resolutions with fancy desktop effects works well on low-end graphics cards, but I wanted smoother performance, silent or near-silent graphics, and plenty of ports for different monitors. What to do?

Why, look for a new card, of course!

The latest 1080 line from Nvidia is overkill for my needs, but the 1060 is perfect. I wanted smoother desktop effects compared to the older Radeon card I had been using, and when I found the EVGA 1060 SC 3GB graphics card on sale, it was a must-buy.

Featuring lower power consumption, more cores, higher clock speeds, five ports to connect a variety of monitors, and favorable performance (in case my original plans on Linux are lackluster I can still use this card elsewhere), this 1060 card is a winner for my humble needs.

There are two versions of the GTX 1060: a 3GB version and a 6GB version. After pondering various benchmarks and reviews, I saw almost no difference between the two versions (other than the huge price difference at the time), so I chose the 3GB version. After all, it was on sale comparable to the cost of a lesser 1050, which only had three ports.

The real questions are these:

  • “How does the EVGA GTX 1060 SC perform in Linux Mint 18.1?”
  • “Is it easy to install drivers?”
  • “Does it even work at all?”

Here is my experience installing and using this card with Linux Mint 18.1 64-bit.

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Hard Drive Caching in Windows 7

📅 May 6, 2017
After experiencing good success in Linux using RapidDisk and Flashcache (on older kernels) to speed up mechanical hard drive reads, I thought it would be fun to discover if such software existed for Windows.

Is it possible to install hard drive caching software in Windows 7? How would it perform?

I tried four programs, PrimoCache, HDDTurbo, SuperCache 6, and eboostr, and tested reads using CrystalDiskMark. Here are my results.

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JavaScript: Get a random number within a range

📅 April 26, 2017
The Math object in JavaScript provides the random() function that returns a floating point value from 0 to up to but not including 1.

What if we want to grab an integer, say, from 1 to 25 inclusive?

We can do this easily by modifying the random result to our liking.

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