Posts Tagged how to

Using RapidDisk with VeraCrypt

📅 February 17, 2017
cover“Can I use RapidDisk with VeraCrypt?”

Absolutely. If you have an encrypted volume with VeraCrypt, you can easily add a RAM cache to improve read performance.

The setup is the same as with a regular RapidDisk cache but with an added extra step to map the VeraCrypt volume.

Read the rest of this entry »

, ,

Leave a comment

RapidDisk – Improved Hard Drive Caching

📅 February 14, 2017
coverDo you have some extra RAM in your system?

Want better read speeds from slower mechanical hard drives?

How about adding a RAM drive to your system?

 

RapidDisk is an open source tool for Linux that enables you to create RAM disks for general purpose usage or use them as caching systems for existing hard drives.

I have been using RapidDisk myself, and I can say that it greatly improves the read performance of slow hard drives whether they be single drives or RAID arrays. You can even set up a RapidDisk RAM cache for a USB device. RAM disks are surpringly useful despite being volatile. Best of all, RapidDisk is free to obtain and simple to use after a little reading.

Here is how to use RapidDisk in Linux Mint 18.1 in a simple configuration so you can experience faster read speeds from your hard drives.

Read the rest of this entry »

, ,

Leave a comment

Link Aggregation in Linux Mint 18.1 and Xubuntu 16.04

📅 January 7, 2017
coverDo you have a few spare network interface cards?

Want to increase your local network throughput and handle more traffic?

Link aggregation, or bonding, is a technique that combines two or more network interface cards (NICs) into a single virtual network interface for greater throughput.

For example, two gigabit NICs result in 2 Gbps throughput. Three gigabit NICs allow 3 Gbps throughput. Four allow 4 Gbps, and so on. While these are theoretical maximum values and other factors affect network transfer rates, the point is that multiple network cards acting as a single “card” can transfer more data at a time. As an example, more users can access the same server simultaneously without seeing any noticeable drop in transfer speeds.

Linux supports link aggregation out of the box with only a few modifications. Regular, inexpensive network cards and switches can be used, so there is no need to purchase expensive, specialized hardware. This allows you to reuse existing hardware that you might already have on hand. And yes, it works well.

While link aggregation has worked in the past, newer Linux distributions tend to change a few things, so older setup techniques need revision. This is the case with Linux Mint 18.1. For details regarding the benefits of link aggregation, please have a look at the article describing link aggregation in Linux Mint 17 and Xubuntu 14.04 (July 12, 2014). The information is still relevant.

Link aggregation works well in Linux Mint 18.1, but a few changes are needed in order to make it work. However, it is easier than expected!

Read the rest of this entry »

, ,

Leave a comment

Reconfigure Timezone from the Command Line

📅 October 24, 2016
tzdata2The timezone setting (tzdata) determines how time is displayed on a Linux system. This is specified using a location string, and we can change this string to set a system’s timezone to any timezone on the planet.

Read the rest of this entry »

, ,

Leave a comment

Tidbit: Discovering Xubuntu Distribution from PHP

📅 September 24, 2016
In PHP, we can use php_uname to grab information about the operating system that the server is running on.

echo php_uname(‘s’) will give the name of the OS, but this is a general name. When executed from a server running Xubuntu, it returns the string “Linux.” Is this Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Linux Mint, or…what?

What if we want to get the specific Linux distribution? Is this possible from PHP without performing host OS system calls or executing Bash scripts? Yes.

Read the rest of this entry »

, ,

Leave a comment

Playing DSD Audio Files in Linux

📅 September 6, 2016
dsd“Can I play DSD files in Linux?”

Yes. However, the process is not exactly user-friendly due to DSD being a rather obscure audio format compared to FLAC and MP3. If you want to play .dsf or .dff files in Linux, you must first install players that will support DSD or convert DSD into PCM.

Read the rest of this entry »

,

Leave a comment

Reduce a Computer’s Audio Output Line Hum

📅 August 30, 2016
isolator“Why do I hear a faint hum from my computer’s audio output?”

Computers are electrically noisy environments, and all of those wires and fans and whatnot operating at various frequencies can have unpleasant side-effects on a computer’s audio output.

If you enjoy listening to music played from your computer and if you use the computer’s analog stereo outputs (the 3.5mm line out jack) to connect to an external amplifier or receiver, then you have no doubt encountered the low-frequency hum effect.

Not a mere hiss due to a noisy sound card, but a low hummmmmmmmm that is heard consistently whether or not audio is playing and regardless of the volume level.

This can happen with any home audio equipment, not just computers. Often, it is caused by a ground loop, and the best way to reduce or nearly eliminate this hum is to electrically isolate the audio output (from the computer) from the audio input of the receiver/amplifier.

Read the rest of this entry »

,

Leave a comment