Archive for category linux

Seagate Expansion 4TB External Drive and Linux

📅 March 31, 2019
Need more space for backups using an external USB drive? The Seagate Expansion offers 4TB of unformatted room to grow, and it is compatible with Linux!

Parkinson’s Law of Data states that data expands to fill the available space. A 10MB hard drive was deemed a phenomenal amount of storage space in the early 1980’s with the IBM PC XT.

“Who would possibly fill up 10MB?”

But people managed to fill up that space, and then beg for more. Now, we measure hard drive storage space in gigabytes and terabytes as the demand for more storage space increases.

With all of this data, it is important to back it up, and this is best accomplished on an external medium, such as cloud storage or an external hard drive.

The Seagate Expansion 4TB Portable Hard Drive is an external USB 3.0 drive that offers plenty of room to grow in a fairly small package.

How well does it perform with Linux Mint 19.1? Let’s see…

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How Long Can You Survive A7Xpg?

📅 February 13, 2019
Need a quick game on Linux? Try…get ready for this name…A7Xpg!

 

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SanDisk 400GB MicroSD and Linux

📅 November 23, 2018
“400 GB on a MiscroSD card? Wow!”

MicroSD cards keep growing in capacity. The SanDisk 400GB MicroSD card packs more space than many hard drives onto a tiny wafer that a vacuum cleaner could easily swallow into oblivion.

Does this card work with Linux, and if so, what kind of performance can be expected? Here are my results.

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The Logitech G513 RGB Keyboard and Linux – A Major Delight

📅 October 6, 2018
On my quest to find a worthy successor to the recently departed Corsair Vengeance K70 mechanical keyboard (which did not last as long as I had hoped), I have encountered what is certainly the best keyboard that I have ever used so far: The Logitech G513!

Along the way, I was met with dismal disappointment regarding the Razer Huntsman Elite. Yuck. What a sorry disappointment.

Undeterred, I gave the G513 a try. It costs less than the Huntsman Elite, so can it be any good? After all, a higher price does not translate into a better product. And most importantly, how well does the G513 work with Linux?

I was pleased beyond expectations with the G513, and here are my thoughts.

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The Razer Huntsman Elite Keyboard and Linux – A Major Disappointment

📅 September 23, 2018
The Corsair Vengeance K70 mechanical keyboard with Cherry MX red switches died recently (that keyboard did not last long), so I have been on the hunt (get it, hunt?) for a suitable replacement.

Having grown fond of the mechanical action for typing, programming, and Linux command line warrior stuff, another mechanical keyboard was required. Could I find another keyboard better than the Corsair that I had spent so much time with?

After looking around and reading reviews, I decided on the Huntsman Elite RGB keyboard from Razer. What was it like to type on? How did the RGB lights perform? And most importantly: how well does it work with Linux?

Despite the promises on the box and on Razer’s web site, I was not impressed, and here is the story…

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PNY Elite-X 256G MicroSD and Linux

📅 August 8, 2018
MicroSD cards continue to increase in capacity, decrease in price, and increase in speed.

The PNY Elite-X 256GB microSD is another entry in the upper-end consumer-grade microSD market. How does it compare to the Samsung EVO Plus 256GB card? Any speed differences? Does it work in Linux?

I purchased my own PNY Elite-X, and here are my results.

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Linux Mint 19 Running Well

📅 August 6, 2018
Linux Mint 19 was released about a month ago, and for the past few weeks, I have been reveling in the continued delight of yet another great Linux distribution.

Quick installation, a refined user interface, excellent hardware support (for my hardware, at least), and familiarity make this an enjoyable operating system to pick up and use without the desktop environment getting in the way of using the computer.

Other than a few issues, such as cumbersome proprietary video drivers (which is not the fault of Linux Mint) and cryptswap, I have experienced good success and switched to this distribution for my main system. Version 19 is based upon Ubuntu 18.04 LTS released a few months prior, so the support will be valid for another two years.

If you like Linux Mint and are already familiar with its operation, then you will feel at home with this new release. If not, Linux Mint is friendly to new users. It’s a win for both parties.

Well worth checking out either on real hardware or in a virtual machine, so give it a try if you are looking for an easy-to-use Linux distribution to share with your friends or those new to Linux.

 

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