Posts Tagged command line

i7z – What Is Your i7/i5/i3 CPU Doing?

📅 December 20, 2016
coverAre you pondering important life questions, such as, “What is the temperature and current frequency of my Core i7 CPU?”

“I have no idea what C0/C1/C3/C6/C7 states are, but I sure want to know how much time my CPU spends in them.”

“What is the stepping, model, and family info of my i7 CPU? Are we related in some way?”

Well, ponder no longer because the command line program i7z (a reporting tool for Intel i7/i5/i3 processors) will answer those questions for you in real time. And if that is not enough, information can be logged to a log file for serious analysis later.

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bindechexascii – The Command-Line Converter

📅 December 16, 2016
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Wha…what?

Need a quick and easy way to convert between binary, ASCII, decimal, and hexadecimal values?

Try bindechexascii!

 

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Hide Text in Text Files Using stegsnow

📅 December 14, 2016
coverSteganography is the practice (or art) of hiding secret messages in plain view.

Take an image file of a flower, for example. Opening the file shows a flower. Whoopie. However, there might be a hidden message encoded inside the bits and bytes of the image data that is not visible unless certain software is used to decode it.

The same can apply to text files. You could write an innocent readme.txt file that looks like any other text file of instructions when opened normally. With steganography, you could encode a secret message within readme.txt that includes game cheat codes, secret contact information, a cookie recipe, ASCII art, or whatever else you wish to convey to your accomplice who receives the file.

stegsnow is a fun command line program that encodes secret messages in ASCII text files. Use stegsnow to encode a text file with a hidden message, and then use stegsnow again to extract the message from the file. The file’s text contents are not altered, so the file reads the same as it did before encoding. Anyone unaware would open the text file and see the innocent text contents in a standard text editor, but “those who know” would run the file with stegsnow to see a completely different message.

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rig – The Random Identity Generator

📅 December 7, 2016
coverSeeking fun with random identities? Need a fake name and address but cannot seem to think of anything?

Try rig!

rig is a command line program that generates simple names and addresses for use with registration where you might need a fake name in order to avoid spam or for whatever reason…like just plain fun.

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Mesmerize Yourself with ASCII Art Juggling

📅 November 27, 2016
aajm1Here is another entry in the totally-useless-but-fun-to-distract-yourself-with category of programs for Linux that make Linux fun.

The ASCII art jugglemaster (aajm) program shows a man juggling balls in a terminal using ASCII art.

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Play a Terminal Game with Cavez of Phear

📅 November 19, 2016
cavez2CAVEZ of PHEAR is an arcade-style game that runs inside a terminal. The gameplay is similar to Boulder Dash — actually, it is a Boulder Dash clone — where you must collect all diamonds from a maze while avoiding a squishy demise if excavating beneath boulders.

The best part? The game is made entirely in ASCII!

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Reconfigure Timezone from the Command Line

📅 October 24, 2016
tzdata2The timezone setting (tzdata) determines how time is displayed on a Linux system. This is specified using a location string, and we can change this string to set a system’s timezone to any timezone on the planet.

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