Posts Tagged command line

Set Custom Folder Icon Using Bash

📅 June 12, 2018
You are probably aware that you can set a custom icon using the file manager’s GUI, but did you know that you can also set a custom icon on a folder using the command line?

That’s right. The gvfs-set-attribute command will allow you to set a custom icon to a directory so that the new icon will appear in place of the default folder icon when viewed in a GUI file manager.

This is particularly handy for assigning multiple custom icons for movie and music directories while preserving the default folder icons for other system directories. It can be scripted, and it is easier to do than you think.

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ascii2binary

📅 May 20, 2018
Do you need a program that will convert an ASCII code into a character?

How about converting a number represented as ASCII into its binary equivalent based upon the data type you specify?

Try ascii2binary. Available from the Ubuntu repository, ascii2binary can be used alone or in scripts to convert a decimal, octal, binary, or hexadecimal input into its ASCII character or convert a text file of numbers into a binary file of numbers.

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Terminal Multiplexing with tmux

📅 January 2, 2018
Do you find yourself opening a terminal for every new program or command-line based operation you want to perform?

How about opening a terminal to run a GUI program, such as VeraCrypt?

When multiple terminals are open simultaneously, they might make your desktop appear geeky (which is fun), but they can also clutter the desktop quickly. Is there a way to reduce clutter?

Terminal multiplexing is the process of switching among several open terminals (Bash sessions) in a single terminal to avoid the clutter.

One handy program is called tmux. tmux is full-featured program that runs…wait for it…in a terminal, and it allows you to open and manage multiple terminals within. The result? A single terminal that reduces desktop clutter.

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Get System Info with dmidecode

📅 August 28, 2017
The Desktop Management Interface (DMI) is a vendor-neutral, standardized framework for managing and gathering information about a computer system.

 

 

 

Which memory slots are populated?

What is the BIOS revision number?

What ports are located on the motherboard?

What is the processor version?

Using a program called dmidecode, these questions and many, many other technical details can be retrieved and displayed at the command line without having to open your computer case and reading tiny print on labels or in poorly-translated multi-lingual manuals.

As long as your hardware supports the DMI protocol, which is almost all modern hardware these days, then you can view the information using dmidecode.

Do you need to know the configured clock speed of your RAM? dmidecode will report the speed without needing to reboot into BIOS. Sure, fancy GUI programs, such as hardinfo, report identical information, but sometimes you simply want to impress your inner geek with command-line goodness.

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View ASCII Art System Info with Neofetch

📅 August 24, 2017
Have you opened a terminal, such as RetroPie for the Raspberry Pi, and admired the RetroPie ASCII art logo adjacent to a brief system information listing?

Wouldn’t it be fun to do the same in a desktop Linux installation?

You can!

With a program called neofetch, you can view the ASCII art logo for your current distribution complete with a synopsis of system information.

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Color Test Your Terminal

📅 April 11, 2017
Are you curious to find out what colors your terminal supports?

The program colortest-python answers this question by displaying colors in a variety of ways.

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Put Filenames in Bash Array

📅 April 8, 2017
Bash arrays can be tricky, so here are a few hints to aid understanding.

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