Posts Tagged network

Link Aggregation in Linux Mint 18.1 and Xubuntu 16.04

📅 January 7, 2017
coverDo you have a few spare network interface cards?

Want to increase your local network throughput and handle more traffic?

Link aggregation, or bonding, is a technique that combines two or more network interface cards (NICs) into a single virtual network interface for greater throughput.

For example, two gigabit NICs result in 2 Gbps throughput. Three gigabit NICs allow 3 Gbps throughput. Four allow 4 Gbps, and so on. While these are theoretical maximum values and other factors affect network transfer rates, the point is that multiple network cards acting as a single “card” can transfer more data at a time. As an example, more users can access the same server simultaneously without seeing any noticeable drop in transfer speeds.

Linux supports link aggregation out of the box with only a few modifications. Regular, inexpensive network cards and switches can be used, so there is no need to purchase expensive, specialized hardware. This allows you to reuse existing hardware that you might already have on hand. And yes, it works well.

While link aggregation has worked in the past, newer Linux distributions tend to change a few things, so older setup techniques need revision. This is the case with Linux Mint 18.1. For details regarding the benefits of link aggregation, please have a look at the article describing link aggregation in Linux Mint 17 and Xubuntu 14.04 (July 12, 2014). The information is still relevant.

Link aggregation works well in Linux Mint 18.1, but a few changes are needed in order to make it work. However, it is easier than expected!

Read the rest of this entry »

, ,

Leave a comment

Speed Up Your Home Network With Link Aggregation in Linux Mint 17 and Xubuntu 14.04

July 12, 2014
net028Would you like to have a faster home network? Do you have any spare network interface cards (NICs) lying around unused? Do you run Linux?

If yes, then you can put your spare hardware to good use to increase the speed of your LAN and increase its fault tolerance. Link aggregation, also known as port trunking or bonding, lets you pair a group of network cards together so they operate as a single, faster logical network card.

Despite the intimidating name, link aggregation in Linux is inexpensive, simple to set up, and supported natively. No need for special vendor drivers or program recompilation. Once set up and running, operation is transparent to programs. Just use the network like you normally would.

This article shows how to set up link aggregation in Linux Mint 17 and Xubuntu 14.04 using everyday, consumer-grade gigabit networking hardware. Stuff you might already have. Nothing fancy, complex, or exotic. Throughput boosts from 1 Gb/s to 2 Gb/s or 3 Gb/s depending upon the number of network cards and ports used.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , ,

Leave a comment

slurm Network Load Monitor

June 16, 2014
slurm08Are you looking for a terminal-based network load monitor? Do you want to check if that download is really working — preferably with colored ASCII graphics?

Try slurm!

Read the rest of this entry »

, , ,

Leave a comment

Creating a Common Shared Directory for Virtual Machines and Trusted Users on a LAN

sh002A previous article, Local File Sharing in Linux, provided a way for local users on the same Linux computer to share files among themselves where each user viewed himself as the owner of the file. There are other ways to achieve similar results, but given the objectives, this technique worked well.

However, that works well for local users. What about extending the access to networked users on the same LAN? How about providing a common shared directory so Linux and Windows virtual machines can share files among themselves?

VirtualBox is a popular virtualization program that has a built-in folder sharing feature that allows the guest (the OS running inside VirtualBox) operating system to access host (the system on which VirtualBox is running) directories without using a network connection. This option is found in the VirtualBox menubar Devices > Shared Folders, and it allows the guest direct access to host files even if the network cable is disconnected.

This works well with a Windows guest, but a Linux guest is a little trickier to configure. Yes, VirtualBox provides the vbox server for Linux and it does provide direct access to host directories, but there have been issues with Linux. In the end, other networking technologies, such as SSH, FTP, and Samba, are easier to configure and maintain for Linux (guest)-to-Linux (host) file transfers through VirtualBox. This article covers how to handle Linux (guest)-to-Linux (host) file sharing without using the vbox server.

The public shared directory presented in this article must meet certain objectives:

  • One specific shared directory located on the host.
  • Accessible by any user/virtual machine connected to the network.
  • No username/password needed. Simply enter the shared IP address to connect.
  • Any user may create/modify/delete any other user’s files and directories.
  • User access is restricted to the shared directory.

These items are not recommended for use on a public network whose user reputations are questionable, but this level of freedom is fine for a trusted private network where users and virtual machines trust each other and are guaranteed to be the only users.

This article shows how to set up this arrangement implementing Samba on Linux Mint 15, though other Linux distributions should work as well. There are separate steps that must be configured on the host and for the guests.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , ,

Leave a comment

The Killer E2200 Network Platform and Linux

e2200portThere is a new type of Gigabit Ethernet port making its appearance on some high-end motherboards and dedicated gaming NICs. Perhaps you have seen it since it sometimes has the style of a red network port. It is called the Killer E2200 Intelligent Networking Platform, and it is incompatible with Linux kernels lower than 3.10.

I recently had the opportunity to test a motherboard containing the Killer E2205, but while networking worked fine with Windows 7, Linux support was kicked to the curb.

But all is not lost! The E2200 series is supported with Linux kernel 3.10 and higher.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , ,

Leave a comment

Zonet ZSR4174WE – Wireless Networking on the Go

June 27, 2012
We’ve all been there.

You and your buddies are enjoying a beautiful hiking expedition through the mountainous wilds of whatchamacallit away from the clutter of modern civilization.

Finding a suitable place to camp, you pitch your tents, and, later that night, you are all relaxed around the campfire roasting marshmallows in one hand and doodling on your laptops with the other. Gooey marshmallow trails streak across the keyboards.

Suddenly, one member of the group has a thought: “Wouldn’t it be great if we could network our computers together out here in the middle of nowhere?”

You grin like a Cheshire cat as you reach into your bag and pull out the Zonet ZSR4174WEportable access point (AP) and router.

“Always be prepared,” you boast. Minutes later, you and your buddies are swapping files and networking under the stars, and everyone thinks you are a genius.

Read the rest of this entry »

, ,

Leave a comment

Retroshare – Secure, Private File-Sharing

April 4, 2012
The file-sharing world has been turned upside down in recent months.

Even though file-sharing has legitimate uses, all it takes is one rogue user — probably an anonymous individual from another country — to upload a restricted file using your service, and that, if discovered, can cause the copyright cartel to invoke the powers of the state upon your system, leading to raids, seizures, and prosecution — even across international boundaries.

Many people need a file-sharing system whether for personal use or to conduct business, so is there any way to share files with only the people you trust so that unknown users cannot share files that could put you in trouble?

A number of alternate file-sharing systems are gaining recognition quickly in answer to this question, and one such program is Retroshare.

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , ,

1 Comment