Posts Tagged network

Manage ProFTP Users with MySQL

๐Ÿ“… February 13, 2018
Suppose you want to maintain a list of users allowed to login to an FTP server but you do not want to create user accounts for them on the Linux system. The FileZilla server has this feature built in, so is there are way to specify usernames and their passwords for FTP users in ProFTP?

Yes!

One way is to use a MySQL database that ProFTP checks for allowed users. If a user is listed in the database, then he is allowed to log in.

This might sound like overkill. Why use a full-fledged relational database for FTP? Actually, you can much, much more than manage logins. Every aspect of the FTP session can be recorded and analyzed using a database. Uploads, IP addresses, last logins, login history, access count, upload/download quotas, and more are possible. Almost anything you want to record about your users is possible with ProFTP and a database, such as MySQL.

This article shows how to set up ProFTP to access a MySQL database that lists users allowed to log in without needing to create user accounts on a Linux Mint system.

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Create Anonymous Virtual Hosts with ProFTP โ€“ Part 2: ProFTP Configuration

๐Ÿ“… February 7, 2018
Part 2

With the virtual environment set up and the default ProFTP server running, let’s configure ProFTP to serve two virtual FTP hosts that allow anonymous logins each.

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Create Anonymous Virtual Hosts with ProFTP – Part 1: Platform Setup

๐Ÿ“… February 6, 2018
Part 1

FTP might have been around for a long time, but it remains a superb way to transfer files on a private LAN.

Fast and easy to set up, FTP (File Transfer Protocol) is something worth considering if you host files that must be accessed by nodes on your network. A local Ubuntu repository? Quick storage sharing? Maybe you need a quick and easy way to anonymously upload and download files from within Nemo or Filezilla? FTP can be configured for a variety of uses.

“But, but, but…FTP is not secure! Why would I use that?”

Yes, plain FTP transfers password and data for the viewing of anyone sniffing the network, but we are talking about a private LAN under your control. No Internet access. Of course, FTP traffic can be encrypted using SSL/TLS or SSH in order to make FTP secure.

For this project, we are going to use ProFTP to set up two virtual FTP servers in a Linux Mint virtual machine (VirtualBox) that allow anonymous logins and use SSL certificates for encryption. In addition, the ftp data will be stored on its own virtual hard drive. The practice gleaned here can be applied to real hardware.

Ready? Here is how it’s done.

 

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The Plugable USB 3 Ethernet Adapter and Linux

๐Ÿ“… January 25, 2017
eth01USB 3.0/3.1 is fast enough to accommodate almost any external device at full speed. This includes network adapters.

Need an extra RJ-45 network port on your system? Do you have a portable netbook or laptop thatย you need to plug into aย LAN quickly?

The Plugable USB 3 ethernet adapter is a small device that allows you to connect a computer to a LAN through a USB port. It offers full duplex throughput up to gigabit speeds if connected to a USB 3.0/3.1 port. And best of all, it is 100% plug-and-play compatible with Linux.

Here are my results after using this device with Linux Mint 18.1 and USB 2/3/3.1.

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Link Aggregation in Linux Mint 18.1 and Xubuntu 16.04

๐Ÿ“… January 7, 2017
coverDo you have a few spare network interface cards?

Want to increase your local network throughput and handle more traffic?

Link aggregation, or bonding, is a technique that combines two or more network interface cards (NICs) into a single virtual network interface for greater throughput.

For example, two gigabit NICs result in 2 Gbps throughput. Three gigabit NICs allow 3 Gbps throughput. Four allow 4 Gbps, and so on. While these are theoretical maximum values and other factors affect network transfer rates, the point is that multiple network cards acting as a single “card” can transfer more data at a time. As an example, more users can access the same server simultaneously without seeing any noticeable drop in transfer speeds.

Linux supports link aggregation out of the box with only a few modifications. Regular, inexpensive network cards and switches can be used, so there is no need to purchase expensive, specialized hardware. This allows you to reuse existing hardware that you might already have on hand. And yes, it works well.

While link aggregation has worked in the past, newer Linux distributions tend to change a few things, so older setup techniques need revision.ย This is the case with Linux Mint 18.1. For details regarding the benefits of link aggregation, please have a look at the article describing link aggregation in Linux Mint 17 and Xubuntu 14.04ย (July 12, 2014). The information is still relevant.

Link aggregation works well in Linux Mint 18.1, but a few changes are needed in order to make it work. However, it is easier than expected!

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Speed Up Your Home Network With Link Aggregation in Linux Mint 17 and Xubuntu 14.04

โŒš July 12, 2014
net028Would you like to have a faster home network? Do you have any spare network interface cards (NICs) lying around unused? Do you run Linux?

If yes, then you can put your spare hardware to good use to increase the speed of your LAN and increase its fault tolerance. Link aggregation, also known as port trunking or bonding, lets you pair a group of network cards together so they operate as a single, faster logical network card.

Despite the intimidating name, link aggregation in Linux is inexpensive, simple to set up, and supported natively. No need for special vendor drivers or program recompilation. Once set up and running, operation is transparent to programs. Just use the network like you normally would.

This article shows how to set up link aggregation in Linux Mint 17 and Xubuntu 14.04 using everyday, consumer-grade gigabit networking hardware. Stuff you might already have. Nothing fancy, complex, or exotic. Throughput boosts from 1 Gb/s to 2 Gb/s or 3 Gb/s depending upon the number of network cards and ports used.

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slurm Network Load Monitor

โŒš June 16, 2014
slurm08Are you looking for a terminal-based network load monitor? Do you want to check if that download is really working — preferably with colored ASCII graphics?

Try slurm!

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