Posts Tagged Linux Mint

Experience Better Sound in Linux with the Asus Xonar DX Sound Card

πŸ“… January 13, 2017
coverSo, you have finally constructed your ultimate tower of silicon greatness featuring quad SLI, NVMe storage, 4TB SSD data, 4K monitors, the latest multi-core CPU, maxed out RAM, and…what? You’re still using motherboard audio? You poor thing. Let’s fix that.

This article looks at the Asus Xonar DX PCIe sound card running in Linux and compares it with existing motherboard audio featuring the ALC1150, which is found on most higher-end motherboards these days.

Is there a difference in sound quality between a dedicated sound card and motherboard audio? Here are my tests and opinions from using the two myself.

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Adding USB 3.1 to Linux

πŸ“… January 10, 2017
coverLinux supports USB 3.1 in the kernel. Why not show Linux some love and give it the hardware to use?

‘Tis a pity, but USB 3.0 is slow. Well, slow compared to SATA 6Gbps and the blazing fast M.2 NVMe. USB 3.0 tops out at ~440 MBps for external SSDs while SATA maxes out at ~540 MBps…depending upon the quality of the SSD.

Let’s go faster!

That is what USB 3.1 is for. The best part is that the prices have fallen, and you do not have to wait for future USB 3.1 motherboards. If you are running Linux, then you can add USB 3.1 to your existing system now. Even if your motherboard is an older model that only supports USB 3.0 and PCI Express 2.0, you can install inexpensive PCIe USB 3.1 cards to provide the faster ports and reap the benefits.

This article looks at the QICENT Dual-port USB 3.1 PCIe card and tests its performance on two different motherboards with PCIe 3.0 and PCIe 2.0.

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Software – A Better Software Manager for Linux Mint

πŸ“… December 23, 2016
coverLinux Mint is a superb operating system, but its default software manager is rather lacking. WeΒ can install a better software manager that looks sleeker and is easier to navigate than Linux Mint’s Software Manager.

This article shows how to install the gnome-software program, which is the same user-friendly software manager seen in Ubuntu and Xubuntu. Yes, we can use it in Linux Mint.

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Customize Theme Colors with Oomox

πŸ“… August 22, 2016
lanceloth2aInterested in customizing your Linux desktop theme colors to a fine degree? Try Oomox!

Oomox is a program that lets you adjust and create your GTK theme colors for your Linux desktop and save the result as a brand new theme set.

Light themes. Dark themes. Classic themes. Wild themes. Your imagination is the limit!

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Samsung EVO 128GB MicroSD and Linux

πŸ“… July 29, 2016
evo128_frontWhat? Is a 200GB MicroSD card too much storage space?

The 128GB capacity cards are plentiful, and one good card worth considering is the Samsung EVO 128GB microsd. It is compatible with Linux, it offers decent read and write speeds, and it features the quality we expect from Samsung.

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SanDisk 200GB MicroSD, Linux, and the PSP

πŸ“… July 20, 2016
200g1What? 128GB is not enough space for your camera? How about something larger…

The ubiquitous, tiny memory card format is becoming available in increasing capacities. While 256G versions are available, they are expensive due to their recent entry onto the market.

What to do? Why, use a 200G capacity card, of course! Its much lower price point (compared to a 256GB card) and larger capacity over a 128G card offers plenty of space for digital goodies.

The SanDisk Ultra 200GB MicroSD card is a class 10, UHS-1 card that has received much favorable praise for its fast read speeds and reasonable price per gigabyte, but is it compatible with Linux? If so, what are benchmarks like?

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A Few Notes About Linux Mint 18 Themes

πŸ“… July 18, 2016
breezeThe Linux Mint desktop looks good, but can I customize it?

Yes! One of the best aspects of Linux is its limitless tweaking and customization where the only limit is your own imagination.

In Linux Mint 18, you can easily change the window borders, icons, controls, mouse pointer, and Cinnamon desktop panel from the Themes dialog of System Settings.

By downloading various new themes and icon packs, you can make the Mint desktop look however you want. Do you prefer a gaudy dark-green alien interface? How about a sleek, white, minimalist desktop that screams space-age future? Craving the user interface of days gone by? You can even alter Mint to the point where it looks like any other operating system available and fool unsuspecting users.

Here are a few notes about Linux Mint 18 themes.

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